Press Kit

The following press release and hi-resolution imagery (ZIP folders) are suitable for print content. Please be sure to see and credit the artist’s work using the included image credit guide for each exhibit.

Eden Turned on Its Side Press Release >

Images and Credit Lines >

Meridel Rubenstein, Eden Turned on Its Side is a major photographic artwork comprised of three parts: Photosynthesis, Volcano Cycle, and Eden in Iraq. The work is about human relationships to the environment on the scales of human time, geological time, and mythical time. Photosynthesis focuses on the natural cycle of the seasons and our interdependence on trees for our existence, including the very air we breathe. Volcano Cycle documents the active volcanoes of the Indonesian Ring of Fire to consider ecological change on the non-human scale of deep, geological time. Eden in Iraq explores environmental devastation and renewal at the site of Biblical Eden in Southern Iraq.

This will be the first showing of Meridel Rubenstein, Eden Turned on Its Side that includes selections from all three of its component series.

—————–

The following press release and hi-resolution imagery (ZIP folders) are suitable for print content. Please be sure to see and credit the artist’s work using the included image credit guide for each exhibit.

Long Environmentalism in the Near North; Subhankar Banerjee: Activism – Photographs – Writing Press Release >

Long Environmentalism in the Near North; Subhankar Banerjee: Activism – Photographs – Writing Images and Credit Lines >

In a recent essay Subhankar Banerjee coined the term ‘long environmentalism’ to draw attention to environmental justice engagements that last, not merely weeks or years, but decades, and become inter-generational. The exhibition presents a selection of his photographs, writing, lectures, interviews and other activist initiatives over the past sixteen years that collectively continue to contribute to the long environmentalism in Arctic North America. It highlights the resistance movements and coalitional politics to stop destructive fossil fuels development projects in lands and waters in Arctic Alaska, which are home to an incredible chorus of biotic life and have sustained, nutritionally, culturally and spiritually, the Gwich’in and the Iñupiat indigenous communities for millennia. The exhibition also includes a photograph from Siberia that alludes to what anthropologist Piers Vitebsky has called ‘Outliving the Empire’.

Residents of the lower latitude generally consider the Arctic as the ‘Far North’, a place disconnected from their daily lives and concerns. Banerjee’s work urges us to consider the Arctic instead as the ‘Near North’, a place that connects us all in material and intangible ways. The Arctic is the bellwether of climate change as it continues to warm at a rate of at least twice the global average, and yet paradoxically, the Arctic and non-Arctic nation states are pushing hard to exploit its fossil fuels reserves, the burning of which will only exacerbate Arctic warming, and which in turn will affect the whole planet as the top of the Earth is the integrator of our planet’s climate systems. Engaging in ‘long environmentalism’ we may derail this suicidal trajectory.

The UNM Art Museum would like to thank the Lannan Foundation for their generous support of this exhibition.

—————–

 

 

Be Sociable, Share!